What You Need to Know About California’s New Anti-Harassment Law

As you may have heard, on September 30, 2018, California Governor Jerry Brown signed into law SB 1343 which expands the existing mandatory harassment prevention training obligations for employers. This new law requires that California employers provide harassment prevention training for all employees.

  • Who: Any employer with 5 or more employees must train all employees (not just supervisors). The definition of “employee” now includes all seasonal and temporary employees.
  • Deadline: All relevant employees must be trained by January 1, 2020 (which means training needs to happen in 2019).
  • Frequency: Every 2 years.
  • Content: Required training topics were established in 2007 by AB 1825 and subsequent FEHA regulations. This is now augmented by another law enacted on September 30th, 2018 (SB 1300) which authorizes employers to include bystander intervention training (but does not mandate it).
  • Duration: At least 2 hours of training for supervisors, at least 1 hour for employees.
  • Record retention: Again, as established by AB 1825 and FEHA regulations, employers are required to keep records of completed training including details of the attendees, training methods used, copies of questions asked and responses given, etc.

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Proposed OSHA Rule for California Indoor Heat Illness Protection due January 1, 2019

On September 29, 2016, Governor Brown signed a bill that directs Cal/OSHA to create a regulation protecting employees of indoor workplaces from heat illness. Section 6720 was added to SB 1167 requiring that a proposed rule be submitted to Cal/OSHA Standards Board by January 1, 2019. The standard would apply to all indoor work areas where the temperature equals or exceeds 80 degrees Fahrenheit when employees are present. Continue reading “Proposed OSHA Rule for California Indoor Heat Illness Protection due January 1, 2019”

Employer Responsibilities – Accident Investigations

Topic: Accident Investigation Forms

Importance: Requirement

The Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Act of 1970 requires certain employers to prepare and maintain records of work related injuries and illnesses. In fulfillment of this requirement, Continue reading “Employer Responsibilities – Accident Investigations”