Throw Out All Your Romaine Lettuce, Now!

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CDC is advising that U.S. consumers not eat any romaine lettuce, and retailers and restaurants not serve or sell any, until we learn more about the outbreak. This investigation is ongoing and the advice will be updated as more information is available.

  • Consumers who have any type of romaine lettuce in their home should not eat it and should throw it away, even if some of it was eaten and no one has gotten sick.
    • This advice includes all types or uses of romaine lettuce, such as whole heads of romaine, hearts of romaine, and bags and boxes of precut lettuce and salad mixes that contain romaine, including baby romaine, spring mix, and Caesar salad.
    • If you do not know if the lettuce is romaine or whether a salad mix contains romaine, do not eat it and throw it away.
    • Wash and sanitize drawers or shelves in refrigerators where romaine was stored. Follow these five steps to clean your refrigerator.
  • Restaurants and retailers should not serve or sell any romaine lettuce, including salads and salad mixes containing romaine.
  • Take action if you have symptoms of an E. coli infection:
    • Talk to your healthcare provider.
    • Write down what you ate in the week before you started to get sick.
    • Report your illness to the health department.
    • Assist public health investigators by answering questions about your illness.

Symptoms of E. coli Infection

Illustration of a person with stomach pain.

People usually get sick from Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) 2–8 days (average of 3–4 days) after swallowing the germ.

Some people with a STEC infection may get a type of kidney failure called hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS).

E. coli infection is usually diagnosed by testing a stool sample.

Antibiotics are not recommended for patients with suspected E. coli infections until diagnostic testing can be performed and E. coli infection is ruled out. Some studies have shown that administering antibiotics to patients with E. coli infections might increase their risk of developing HUS, and a benefit of treatment has not been clearly demonstrated.

For more information, see Symptoms of E. coli Infection.

 

As reported by the CDC: https://www.cdc.gov/ecoli/2018/o157h7-11-18/index.html.

 

What You Need to Know About California’s New Anti-Harassment Law

As you may have heard, on September 30, 2018, California Governor Jerry Brown signed into law SB 1343 which expands the existing mandatory harassment prevention training obligations for employers. This new law requires that California employers provide harassment prevention training for all employees.

  • Who: Any employer with 5 or more employees must train all employees (not just supervisors). The definition of “employee” now includes all seasonal and temporary employees.
  • Deadline: All relevant employees must be trained by January 1, 2020 (which means training needs to happen in 2019).
  • Frequency: Every 2 years.
  • Content: Required training topics were established in 2007 by AB 1825 and subsequent FEHA regulations. This is now augmented by another law enacted on September 30th, 2018 (SB 1300) which authorizes employers to include bystander intervention training (but does not mandate it).
  • Duration: At least 2 hours of training for supervisors, at least 1 hour for employees.
  • Record retention: Again, as established by AB 1825 and FEHA regulations, employers are required to keep records of completed training including details of the attendees, training methods used, copies of questions asked and responses given, etc.

Jennie-O Turkey Recall!

Jennie-O Turkey has issued a recall of over 90,000 lbs of meat due to possible Salmonella contamination. Here are the specifics of the meat the USDA have identified as possibly contaminated:

The raw ground turkey products items were produced on September 11, 2018. The following products are subject to recall: [View Labels (PDF only)]

  • 1-lb. packages of “Jennie-O GROUND TURKEY 93% LEAN | 7% FAT” with “Use by” dates of 10/01/2018 and 10/02/2018.
  • 1-lb. packages of “Jennie-O TACO SEASONED GROUND TURKEY” with a “Use by” date of 10/02/2018.
  • 1-lb. packages of “Jennie-O GROUND TURKEY 85% LEAN | 15% FAT” with a “Use by” date of 10/02/2018.
  • 1-lb. packages of “Jennie-O ITALIAN SEASONED GROUND TURKEY” with a “Use by” date of 10/02/2018.

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “P-190” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to retail locations nationwide.

Read the full details here: https://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/recalls-and-public-health-alerts/recall-case-archive/archive/2018/recall-112-2018-release

Proposed OSHA Rule for California Indoor Heat Illness Protection due January 1, 2019

On September 29, 2016, Governor Brown signed a bill that directs Cal/OSHA to create a regulation protecting employees of indoor workplaces from heat illness. Section 6720 was added to SB 1167 requiring that a proposed rule be submitted to Cal/OSHA Standards Board by January 1, 2019. The standard would apply to all indoor work areas where the temperature equals or exceeds 80 degrees Fahrenheit when employees are present.

In November 2015, the California Occupational Safety and Health Appeals Board has ruled in favor of Cal/OSHA’s citations against two employers because their Injury and Illness Prevention Programs (IIPP) failed to effectively address the hazard of indoor heat.

“This is the first case of indoor heat considered by the Appeals Board. In this case, the ruling affirms that California’s IIPP standard can be used to address hazards that the standard does not specifically identify, including indoor heat,” said Christine Baker, Director of the Department of Industrial Relations (DIR).

On-the-job heat exposure is a risk during operations involving high air temperatures, radiant heat sources, high humidity, direct physical contact with hot objects, or strenuous physical activities. Affected workplaces may include foundries, brick-firing and ceramic plants, glass products facilities, rubber products plants, electric utilities, commercial kitchens, laundries, chemical plants, and smelters.

OSHA emphasizes that while thousands of workers become sick each year from occupational heat exposure, the illnesses and deaths that can result are preventable.

All in One Poster Company designed the California Heat Illness Prevention for Indoor Work Environments to address this requirement. Our poster contains steps to prevent heat illness, types of heat illnesses and treatments, and steps that both employees and employers can take to address this issue and create a plan of action. Our easy-to-read, laminated poster is designed to supplement the mandatory training that will be required by the Cal/OSHA standard. It can also be used as a quick reference guide in preventing heat stress, heat exhaustion, heat stroke, or even death.

 

Cited from: https://allinonelaborlawposters.wordpress.com/2018/03/15/proposed-osha-rule-for-california-indoor-heat-illness-protection-due-january-1-2019/

 

 

 

 

OSHA Employee Fall Hazard Penalty

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On February 27th, 2018 the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has cited L.I. Aluminum Design Inc., a Naples-based patio and pool enclosure manufacturer and installer, for failing to protect employees from fall hazards.

Fall outcome? Fatality
OSHA Proposed penalties Continue reading “OSHA Employee Fall Hazard Penalty”

Employer Responsibilities – Accident Investigations

 

Topic: Accident Investigation Forms
Importance: Requirement

The Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Act of 1970 requires certain employers to prepare and maintain records of work related injuries and illnesses. In fulfillment of this requirement, Continue reading “Employer Responsibilities – Accident Investigations”