What You Need to Know About California’s New Anti-Harassment Law

As you may have heard, on September 30, 2018, California Governor Jerry Brown signed into law SB 1343 which expands the existing mandatory harassment prevention training obligations for employers. This new law requires that California employers provide harassment prevention training for all employees.

  • Who: Any employer with 5 or more employees must train all employees (not just supervisors). The definition of “employee” now includes all seasonal and temporary employees.
  • Deadline: All relevant employees must be trained by January 1, 2020 (which means training needs to happen in 2019).
  • Frequency: Every 2 years.
  • Content: Required training topics were established in 2007 by AB 1825 and subsequent FEHA regulations. This is now augmented by another law enacted on September 30th, 2018 (SB 1300) which authorizes employers to include bystander intervention training (but does not mandate it).
  • Duration: At least 2 hours of training for supervisors, at least 1 hour for employees.
  • Record retention: Again, as established by AB 1825 and FEHA regulations, employers are required to keep records of completed training including details of the attendees, training methods used, copies of questions asked and responses given, etc.

Proposed OSHA Rule for California Indoor Heat Illness Protection due January 1, 2019

On September 29, 2016, Governor Brown signed a bill that directs Cal/OSHA to create a regulation protecting employees of indoor workplaces from heat illness. Section 6720 was added to SB 1167 requiring that a proposed rule be submitted to Cal/OSHA Standards Board by January 1, 2019. The standard would apply to all indoor work areas where the temperature equals or exceeds 80 degrees Fahrenheit when employees are present.

In November 2015, the California Occupational Safety and Health Appeals Board has ruled in favor of Cal/OSHA’s citations against two employers because their Injury and Illness Prevention Programs (IIPP) failed to effectively address the hazard of indoor heat.

“This is the first case of indoor heat considered by the Appeals Board. In this case, the ruling affirms that California’s IIPP standard can be used to address hazards that the standard does not specifically identify, including indoor heat,” said Christine Baker, Director of the Department of Industrial Relations (DIR).

On-the-job heat exposure is a risk during operations involving high air temperatures, radiant heat sources, high humidity, direct physical contact with hot objects, or strenuous physical activities. Affected workplaces may include foundries, brick-firing and ceramic plants, glass products facilities, rubber products plants, electric utilities, commercial kitchens, laundries, chemical plants, and smelters.

OSHA emphasizes that while thousands of workers become sick each year from occupational heat exposure, the illnesses and deaths that can result are preventable.

All in One Poster Company designed the California Heat Illness Prevention for Indoor Work Environments to address this requirement. Our poster contains steps to prevent heat illness, types of heat illnesses and treatments, and steps that both employees and employers can take to address this issue and create a plan of action. Our easy-to-read, laminated poster is designed to supplement the mandatory training that will be required by the Cal/OSHA standard. It can also be used as a quick reference guide in preventing heat stress, heat exhaustion, heat stroke, or even death.

 

Cited from: https://allinonelaborlawposters.wordpress.com/2018/03/15/proposed-osha-rule-for-california-indoor-heat-illness-protection-due-january-1-2019/

 

 

 

 

OSHA Employee Fall Hazard Penalty

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On February 27th, 2018 the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has cited L.I. Aluminum Design Inc., a Naples-based patio and pool enclosure manufacturer and installer, for failing to protect employees from fall hazards.

Fall outcome? Fatality
OSHA Proposed penalties Continue reading “OSHA Employee Fall Hazard Penalty”

Employer Responsibilities – Accident Investigations

 

Topic: Accident Investigation Forms
Importance: Requirement

The Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Act of 1970 requires certain employers to prepare and maintain records of work related injuries and illnesses. In fulfillment of this requirement, Continue reading “Employer Responsibilities – Accident Investigations”

2018 Labor Law Posters are in!

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About California Labor Law Poster

Labor law posters – the way your business can stay in legal compliance. This task is made simple by using the California State and Federal Complete Poster by LaborLawCenter™.

By choosing this all-in-one state and federal labor law poster and placing it in a visible location for your employees to see, you are taking the necessary steps to satisfy your company’s employment workplace posting requirement.

Unfortunately, by failing to hang the proper state and federal workplace postings – Continue reading “2018 Labor Law Posters are in!”